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Last Site Update: February 2nd, 2020

Site Review Count: 2380
   



VOTE FOR THE
BEST HONG KONG FILMS
OF THE 2010s

LoveHKFilm is sorta back
to conduct a reader vote for the
Best Hong Kong Films of the 2010s.
A sequel of sorts to previous reader votes
Best HK Movies of the 2000s,
Best HK Movies of the 1990s,
Best HK Movies of the 1980s,
and The Best HK Movies Ever,
this vote asks HK movie fans
to rank their favorite HK films from the
past decade and send them in,
whereupon we tally up the votes and use
about 3 months to write a bunch of
verbose blogs that reveal the
results and make a bunch of bad jokes.
Of course you want to partipcate!
Head over to site blog Damn You, Kozo
for the long-winded explanation.

Back but not really
If you visited this site in the past three years, you'd know that it hasn't been updated in that time, and has been pushing a sappy blog post over any useful content that would normally interest people. Well, that changes today, with a blog post about the Best Hong Kong Films of the 2010s reader vote that we'll be running for the next few months. Woohoo, new content! Our excitement cannot be contained or readily described.

That said, we don't have official plans to return to running the website, i.e., with film reviews and updates to filmographies, but who knows, that could happen one day. Before that, though, we should consider redoing our layout and general site architecture, because right now it basically screams "2004" with its horrible look and feel. Seriously, we dare you to surf this thing on your phone.

At least Hong Kong Cinema is still alive and well, though in a zombie-like state where everything is meant to appeal to China audiences - the very same audiences who now growing increasinly unpopular globally because thier government is, well, kinda mean, to put it lightly.

BTW, we're fine, thanks for asking.

Latest Stuff
- Reader Vote: Start Voting for the Best Hong Kong films of the 2010s.


  Previous Updates

NEW for April 9, 2017
- Added the results of the 36th Hong Kong Film Awards.
- Added the results of the 23rd Hong Kong Film Critics Society Awards.
- Added reviews of See You Tomorrow (2016), The Great Wall (2016), Soul Mate (2016), I Am Not Madame Bovary (2016), L For Love, L For Lies Too (2016), Sword Master (2016), Sky on Fire (2016), McDull: Rise of the Rice Cooker (2016).

NEW for December 16, 2016
- Added the results of the 21st LoveHKFilm Awards.

- Added a list of the 53rd Golden Horse Award Winners.

- Added reviews of Operation Mekong (2016), Weeds on Fire (2016), Heartfall Arises (2016), Call of Heroes (2016), S Storm (2016), Happiness (2016), Mission Milano (2016), Girl of the Big House (2016), Special Female Force (2016), Nessun Dorma (2016), The Dead End (2015) and Super Models (2015).

NEW for October 24, 2016
- Added reviews of Mad World (2016), Three (2016), Cold War 2 (2016)
, League of Gods (2016), Line Walker: The Movie (2016), Bounty Hunters (2016), Fooling Around Jiang Hu (2016), Robbery (2015), The Mobfathers (2016), Kill Time (2016), The Last Women Standing (2015), Monk Comes Down the Mountain (2015) and Blind Massage (2014).

Featured Review


Tony, Takeshi and company

See You Tomorrow
The Wong Kar-Wai aesthetic can be light and breezy – as in the much-beloved Chungking Express – but what happens when you replace the word “breezy” with “zany”? You get See You Tomorrow, an over-the-top romance-comedy produced by Wong Kar-Wai that explores the auteur’s pet obsessions while forcefully shoving wackiness down your throat. Originally titled The Ferryman, the film is based on a short story from the collection “I Belonged To You” by Zhang Jiajia, who's also credited as the film adaptation's director. Eternal Wong Kar-Wai leading man Tony Leung Chiu-Wai stars as Chen Mo, who runs a bar called "See You Tomorrow" alongside property owner Guan Chung (Takeshi Kaneshiro). Chen Mo is also a "ferryman" who helps people through figurative troubled waters until they regain their footing on dry land. Basically, Chen Mo guides individuals through the five stages of grief, though the film’s Chinese equivalent consists of only four stages. Regardless, if you're in the midst of some tough times, Chen Mo has the skills to get you through. (more)

 
 

Newest Reviews  
Failed Bechdel Test: The Movie
Soul Mate
After years of co-directing features (Lover's Discourse, Lacuna) with Jimmy Wan, Derek Tsang goes it alone... (more)
 
Love Sucks Part XVIII
L For Love, L For Lies Too
After celebrating an anniversary of sorts with last year’s, uh, Anniversary Patrick Kong returns... (more)
 
Jiang hu blows

Sword Master

Benny Chan's recent Call of Heroes was a fine Shaw Brothers homage but Tsui Hark and Derek Yee one-up Chan with an actual Shaw Brothers remake. (more)
 
Insurance doesn't cover this
Sky on Fire
Ringo Lam returns with Sky on Fire, his second film after a decade-long hiatus. Maybe he should have taken more time off. (more)
 
They're calling collect
Call of Heroes
Arguably Hong Kong's most consistent action filmmaker, Benny Chan follows... (more)
 
Drop and roll
Weeds on Fire
The debut feature of writer-director Chan Chi-Fat, Weeds on Fire chronicles the true story of Hong Kong's first youth baseball team... (more)
 
#ThankYouMattDamonl
The Great Wall
Zhang Yimou and Hollywood team up for the historical fantasy The Great Wall, and that flushing sound you hear... (more)
 
Thanks for clearing that up

I Am Not Madame Bovary

Director Feng Xiaogang is at it again, trolling audiences and institutions with his movies and still coming up smelling like roses. (more)
 
Panaonic makes the best ones
McDull: Rise of
the Rice Cooker
McDull is back, but he isn't the dimwitted piglet we once knew. McDull once stood for dopey underachievers everywhere... (more)
 
China, F*ck Yeah!
Operation Mekong
Thrilling action sequences are the highlight of director Dante Lam's otherwise average Operation: Mekong. (more)
 
Sadly no Michael Wong
S Storm
The sequel-not-really-a-sequel to the unimpressive Z Storm, director David Lam's S Storm finds returning lead Louis Koo... (more)
 
Triggered
Mad World
Directed by Fresh Wave short film veteran Wong Chun, Mad World is a frank... (more)
 

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